This week’s True Blood addresses themes including having a “normal” life, fear and blind dogma. All of which, in True Blood as in life, lead to wanton destruction, blood shed and pain.

With hate crimes against “Supes” intensifying, we’re given a glimpse into the behind-the-scenes headquarters of the Obama-masked shooters, and a terrifying glimpse into their credo, which obviously has racial undertones, but can be likened to anything that inspires fear in the uneducated, from religion to sexual preference. With the hateful gang declaring, “Hate groups is about more than hate,” and Hoyt attesting that he’s found more acceptance in the hate group that in “church” or “basketball,” the danger facing his morality and ethical code seems imminent.

When asked, “Do you hate Jessica Hanby,” his decisive, “I do,” is met by the enthusiastic, “We’re here to hate her with you,” of the gang. Foreboding times for Jessica. Will Hoyt’s feelings for her be her ultimate saviour? Or will Jason come to the rescue even after his impassioned cussing her out and shooting her in the head?

Elsewhere, religion offers up just as bleak a conclusion, with the Sanguinistas drinking the blood of Lilith which inspires a blood orgy after an acid-like dazed romp in the streets. With Lilth appearing to them in the midst of their hallucinatory craze, encouraging them to drink deeper from the innocent humans they’ve attacked, Grodic appears to Eric who sees (or doesn’t see) Lilith for what she is; illusory. And here precisely is the point True Blood manages to make so succinctly in this episode; no belief is actually real or tangible and as such should be based not on blind dogma but on an informed decision of what you know to be right and wrong. Which, incidentally, probably makes the gratuitous killing of innocents completely illegitimate.

P.S. Did I or did I not tell you Salome was not to be trusted?

The polarity of all the hate and fear is Sookie’s opportunity to become a “real” or “normal” girl. Learning that she can literally drain the fairy out of her, Sookie comes to a quandary, in which, unlike the “Supes” who cannot deny their true nature or the religious vampires who have been cornered by fear and delusion, she has a very real choice to make, even though Sam advises Sookie that even if she were “normal” she’d still be able to see the hate around her, and that it would still bother her.

What struck me here for the first time is Sookie’s lack of belief, because for all her annoying habits, it’s the strength of Sookie’s belief in goodness and light that has often driven the narrative and the triumphant outcomes in True Blood. Perhaps the loss of so many loved ones has finally got to her, with Tara being the last straw. So while Sookie, until now, has been the most boring, one dimensional character on the show, it’s interesting to see something else driving her; a pure desperation as she loses her identity, and as her faith in all the things she knows crumbles around her.

Some after thoughts:

  • SIGH. SWOON. ETC.

  • I hereby declare Tara Worst Stripper Ever.